The Buddha’s Advice for Dealing with Difficult People

22 October 2019 - 29 October 2019
  • Day:Tuesday
  • Time:7.00PM - 9.00PM
  • No of Sessions:2
  • Duration:2 hours
  • Organising Entity:Buddhist Library
  • Event Speaker:John Barclay
  • Enquiries:info@buddhistlibrary.org.au or (02) 9519 6054
  • Location:Buddhist Library
  • Contribution:By donation
  • Course Details:

    22 October 2019

    29 October 2019

    It would be unusual for us to go through life without a misunderstanding, argument, conflict or even a broken relationship with a neighbour, workmate or family member. Often we come to the conclusion that resolving the situation with that person is beyond our capacity or that they are just too difficult to deal with.

    In this 2-week course led by John Barclay, we will explore some teachings of the Buddha to help us in situations where we encounter difficult people.

     

    Teacher’s Profile

    John Barclay is a lay teacher in the tradition of Vietnamese monk Thich Nhat Hanh. He leads the Wednesday evening Lotus Buds group, which is associated with a number of lay Thich Nhat Hanh sanghas in the wider Sydney region and with the “Entering the Stream” Monastery in Beaufort, Victoria. John began practicing with Lotus Buds in 1995. He received the Lamp Transmission from Thich Nhat Hanh in 2004. He is married and has four children.

     

    All Sessions by Donation (Dana) to the Buddhist Library. All donations to the Buddhist Library of $2 and over are tax deductible.

    Dana is the traditional practice of generosity, the extending of one’s goodwill, which is fundamental to Buddhism and other spiritual traditions. The instructions and guidance for this course are offered without requesting a fee and it is up to individuals to determine the amount of dana they would like to offer. It can sometimes be easy to become confused when we are new to this and we wonder “how much should I give?” This is a relevant question in the material economy but an appropriate dana cannot be prescribed but requires sensitivity to its intent and awareness of the costs and expenses associated with organising a course.