Step by Step – An Introduction to Vipassana Meditation

9 April 2019 - 16 April 2019
  • Day:Tuesday
  • Time:7.00PM - 8.30PM
  • No of Sessions:2
  • Duration:1.5 hours
  • Organising Entity:Buddhist Library
  • Event Speaker:Grahame White
  • Enquiries:info@buddhistlibrary.org.au or (02) 9519 6054
  • Location:Buddhist Library
  • Contribution:By donation
  • Course Details:

    9 April 2019

    16 April 2019

    In this two-week course we will be taking a step by step approach to meditation. Starting with the basic theory behind the practice, the benefits of practice and what we can expect from our practice. Each week, instruction will be given so our practice can grow, step by step. You will learn sitting meditation, walking meditation and how-to bring meditation into your daily life to help with everyday stresses.

    Loving Kindness Meditation (Metta) will also be included in this course.

    This course will be suitable for both beginners and those with meditation experience.

     

    About the teacher:

    Grahame White

    Grahame has been involved in Buddhist meditation practice for over 40 years. He began his study in England in 1969 before being ordained as a Buddhist monk for one year in BodhGaya, India in 1971. He took a primary role in the establishment of Vipassana meditation in the tradition of Mahasi Sayadaw in Australia and co-founded the Blue Mountains Insight Meditation Center. He currently leads introductory and day-long courses in Sydney and Wollongong, and also regularly teaches longer intensive retreats in the United States. Grahame has also helped pioneer a workshop format of teaching that enhances the transfer of mindfulness from the formal sitting practice into daily life. He teaches a classical tradition of insight meditation with a relaxed, accessible style.

     

    All Sessions by Donation (Dana) to the Buddhist Library. All donations to the Buddhist Library of $2 and over are tax deductible.
    Dana is the traditional practice of generosity, the extending of one’s goodwill, which is fundamental to Buddhism and other spiritual traditions. The instructions and guidance for this course are offered without requesting a fee and it is up to individuals to determine the amount of dana they would like to offer. It can sometimes be easy to become confused when we are new to this and we wonder “how much should I give?” This is a relevant question in the material economy but an appropriate dana cannot be prescribed but requires sensitivity to its intent and awareness of the costs and expenses associated with organising a course.