Exploring the Meditation Experience

21 February 2020
  • Day:Friday
  • Time:7.00PM - 9.00PM
  • No of Sessions:1
  • Duration:2 hours
  • Organising Entity:Buddhist Library
  • Event Speaker:Patrick Kearney
  • Enquiries:info@buddhistlibrary.org.au or (02) 9519 6054
  • Location:Buddhist Library
  • Contribution:By donation
  • In meditation we cultivate our mind by developing particular mental qualities such as energy, mindfulness, concentration, and so on. Discerning what is happening in our mind as we practise meditation is an important part of its craft. Tonight we will explore four qualities that are present in every meditation experience. These are awareness, perception, feeling and attention. We will see if we can tell what role they play in our practice, and this may help us discern the kind of meditation technique that is best suited to each of us.

     

    Teacher’s Profile

    Patrick Kearney is an independent Dharma teacher in the lineage of Mahasi Sayadaw. He has trained extensively in the Mahasi approach to insight meditation, his principal teachers being Panditarama Sayadaw and John Hale. He has also trained in the Diamond Sangha lineage of Zen Buddhism. His original teacher was Robert Aitken Roshi, and he has also studied with Paul Maloney Roshi.

    Patrick has a particular interest in the original teachings of the Buddha – Buddhism as it was before Theravada or Mahayana were ever thought of. He studies Pali, the language of the earliest surviving Indian recension of the Buddha’s teachings, and seeks to bring his understanding of the early texts to the practice of dharma in the contemporary world.

     

    All Sessions are by Donation (Dana) to the Buddhist Library. All donations to the Buddhist Library of $2 and over are tax deductible.

    Dana is the traditional practice of generosity, the extending of one’s goodwill, which is fundamental to Buddhism and other spiritual traditions. The instructions and guidance for this course are offered without requesting a fee and it is up to individuals to determine the amount of dana they would like to offer. It can sometimes be easy to become confused when we are new to this and we wonder “how much should I give?” This is a relevant question in the material economy but an appropriate dana cannot be prescribed but requires sensitivity to its intent and awareness of the costs and expenses associated with organising a course.